Week 14 May 1 Getting Ready for Pitch Day

This week we’ll begin with time for you to meet in your groups and then you’ll practice your Pitch Day presentations for the rest of the class. Get ready to give lots of constructive feedback.

Our judges for next week’s Pitch Day are:

Tom Gogola, editor at the North Bay Bohemian and Pacific Sun

Ashley Goldsmith, assistant editor, Via

Nena Farrell, digital producer, Sunset

Michelle Fitzhugh Craig, founder and CEO, Shades

Eugenia Chien, co-founder of Muni Diaries

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Week 13 April 24 Crafting Your Pitch

Today we’ll work on your pitches. Pitch Day is just two weeks away! We will discuss the  Magazine Launch Plan Judging Sheet that judges will use to evaluate your launch plans on Pitch Day.

A good pitch needs to simply and clearly answer these questions:

  • Market — Who wants this?
  • Features — What are you going to do for the people who want or need it?
  • Mockup — What will it look like?
  • Sustainability — How will you attract users/customers and create enough revenue to sustain the business?
  • Risks – What is the competition and what things could go wrong?
  • Team — Why are you and your co-founders the right people to do this?

Readings:

Pitch Examples:

Other resources:

Email marketing:

Campus marketing:

Promotional products:

This week in your groups you’ll review what you have accomplished so far and begin to fill in the holes. You should also discuss your 10-minute pitch and start working on your  presentation materials.

For next week: Be ready to do a dry run of your presentation for the class. We’ll give you feedback and get you ready for Pitch Day on May 8!

Week 12 April 17 Your Magazine Launch Plan/The Hard Times

 

https://pbs.twimg.com/profile_images/795392632209817601/EwKSrIjE.jpgToday we’ll hear from Matt Saincome, founder and editor-in-chief of The Hard Times.

Matt will talk about his time as a student at SFSU and how he went on to launch The Hard Times, an online punk satire publication that averages close to 6 million page views per month. He promises to share “some cool insider-y information on how to monetize web traffic.”

Some press on The Hard Times:

Matt also wrote about the Ghost Ship fire for Rolling Stone.

Week 11 April 10 Writing a Business Plan: The Budget

Week 11 April 10
The Big Decision: Should Pitch Day be on May 1 or May 8?

Today we’re going to talk about the dollars and cents of magazine publishing: the budget. We’ll discuss how to figure out how much this venture is going to cost, how you can make it profitable and where you can get money to finance your project.

New Magazine Start-up Guide

Magazine Publishing: A Resource Guide for Magazine Start-ups

How to Write a Business Plan, Small Business Administration

Magazine Business Plan Outline

The Benefits and Drawbacks of Indiegogo and Kickstarter

We’ll also look at some recent magazine launches including:

Alternative Revenue Sources for Magazines

How to Raise Start-Up Capital

MagazineLaunch.com — lots of articles and resources on starting a magazine

Magazine budget discussion

DOWNLOAD: Magazine Budget Worksheet

Budget discussion questions:

  1. Will the magazine publish in print, online, on tablets or some combination?
  2. How often will it publish in print — monthly, quarterly, etc.?
  3. If you have a website, how often will you update online — daily, just when the print edition comes out, some content in-between print editions?
  4. How will you pay staff — full-time salaries, part-time, no pay at first?
  5. Will you have an office or have people work from home? What will your office need — furniture, equipment, phone, Internet, etc.?
  6. Consider different sources of revenue — paid circulation, single-copy sales, membership, product sales, events, digital advertising, print advertising. How do you plan to get revenue?
  7. How much do you need in start-up funding?
  8. Where will you seek start-up capital — venture capitalists, partnership with an organization, crowdfunding campaign, bank loans, Small Business Association loan, friends/family?
  9. Discuss the scale of your start-up — low-budget (no paid staff, no office), medium budget (a few paid staff, bare-bones office), high budget (full staff, office).

At 5 p.m. we’ll meet with guest speakers from Dope Magazine — SFSU alum Ashleigh Castro and Senior Sales Executive Jason Rosenberg.

Week 10 Design

Week 11, April 9

This week we’ll meet Leo Jung, creative director at The California Sunday Magazine.

Principles of Magazine Design

Design Worksheet

This is how you rock a magazine cover design

Week 9 Media kits/Defining Your Audience and Its Needs

This week we’ll discuss how to define and target an audience and how to use needfinding experiments to better understand potential readers and their needs. You’ll also start to plan the media kit and prototype for your magazine.
First we’ll look at some magazine media kits to see what other magazines learn about their readers:

What is a Media Kit?

Top 10 Media Kit Tips for Magazine Publishers

Discussion questions:

1) Who are your target readers?

2) What are their needs?

3) How can your publication fulfill those needs?

Using the Needfinding Toolkit, design a needfinding experiment that will help you get to know your target readers and their needs. It can be a focus group, an online questionnaire or a series of one-on-one interviews. Unlike with most journalism assignments, you MAY interview friends, relatives, roommates, co-workers but they must be in the target audience for your publication. Draft questions that will help you understand your target readers and their needs better. You may ask specific questions about the type of content your publication should include, advertisers that would appeal to readers, logos, design, story ideas, etc.

Assignment: As a group or individually, do one-on-one interviews or lead a focus group for 10-15 target readers of your magazine. Ask people about their needs (related to the topic of your magazine) and how a publication like yours could provide solutions.  Include the results of this needfinding research in your final portfoli

A report on your needfinding assignment is due April 10.

Next week’s guest speaker: Leo Jung, creative director at The California Sunday Magazine

Week 7 Meet the Logic Magazine Team/Midterm Review

Today we’ll review for the midterm exam, scheduled for March 13.

You’ll work in your teams to discuss multi-platform publishing.

Alliance for Audited Media

Alliance for Audited Media video

Discussion questions:

  1. Which platforms do you plan to publish on?
  • Print magazine
  • Books
  • Website
  • Mobile app
  • iPad app
  • Events
  • Television
  • Radio/podcast
  • Newsletters

2. Which of these will act as sources of revenue (and how)?

3. Which are mostly there to build the brand and gain audience?

At 5 p.m. we’ll meet the team behind the launch of Logic Magazine:

Ben Tarnoff writes about technology and politics for The Guardian and Jacobin. His most recent book is The Bohemians: Mark Twain and the San Francisco Writers Who Reinvented American Literature.

Moira Weigel writes about gender and technology for The New York Times, The Guardian, and The New Republic. She is the author of Labor Love: The Invention of Dating.

Jim Fingal is a software developer and the Head of Product Engineering at Amino. He is the co-author, with John D’Agata, of The Lifespan of a Fact.

Christa Hartsock is a software developer and a 2017 Code for America Fellow.

Xiaowei Wang is a designer and developer who works at Mapbox.

Week 6 Field trip to Maker Media

On Monday, Feb. 27,  we have a field trip to Maker Media, 1160 Battery St #125, San Francisco, CA 94111

From SF State, take the M to Embarcadero Station. Walk to Market Street and Main Street and take the F streetcar north toward Fishermans’s Wharf. Get off at Embarcadero and Greenwich Street and walk two blocks to 1160 Battery St. OR you can also walk from Embarcadero Station to Maker Media; it’s about a 17-minute walk. The whole trip from school should take 50-75 minutes. Please plan to arrive by 4 p.m.

https://i2.wp.com/makerfaire.com/wp-content/uploads/gravity_forms/77-bc00ca1eca8f8691bcce0358179b3333/2016/08/Dale-Dougherty-11.jpg?fit=750%2C500We’ll be meeting with Dale Dougherty, founder of MAKE magazine and creator of Maker Faire, which are produced by Maker Media, where he is executive chairman. Here’s his bio and LinkedIn profile.

Please read this article:

Find out more about him by watching this 11-minute TED Talk.

Please come with questions!

If you need to reach me, my cell phone number is 510 421-1613.

See you there!

Rachele

Week 5 Mission Statements/The Hard Times

Feb. 20 Agenda

Quiz on Chapter 5

Mission Statements

Today your team will start to define your target readership and your magazine’s mission.

A good magazine mission statement:

  • Describes the publication
  • Defines how the publication is different from the competition
  • Defines how the audience benefits from reading the publication
  • Should be short and pithy (usually about 3-4 sentences)
  • Captures the spirit and tone of the magazine

Clarify Your Magazine’s Mission Statement, WestGold Editorial

Examples of Magazine Mission Statements:

New York Magazine

The Atlantic

Cosmopolitan

GQ

Sativa

High Times

Archer Magazine

Bitch

Family Circle

Rolling Stone

Travel & Leisure

Darling Magazine

In your teams…

  1. Write a mission statement for your magazine
  2. Describe three target readers: Give each one a name, age, profession, interests, personality traits
  3. Think about what each of these target readers need and how you will serve those needs

Homework: Identify your direct competition and other magazines in your space. Think about how your magazine will be different. What will you offer that these magazines don’t? Come ready to discuss on March 6.

Next week: Field trip to Maker Media, 1160 Battery St #125, San Francisco, CA 94111

From SF State, take the M to Embarcadero Station. Walk to Market Street and Main Street and take the F streetcar north toward Fishermans’s Wharf. Get off at Embarcadero and Greenwich Street and walk two blocks to 1160 Battery St. You can also walk from Embarcadero Station to Maker Media; it’s about a 17-minute walk. The whole trip from school should take 50-75 minutes. Please plan to arrive by 4 p.m.

 

Week 4 Elevator Pitches

Week 4 2/13/2017

Quiz on Chapters 6 and 8

Today we’ll hear your elevator pitches for new magazines and then form teams for your magazine launch projects. Prepare to present a 1- to 2-minute “elevator pitch” for the magazine project you’d like to work on this semester. Your pitch should include:

  • a working title
  • a specific target audience
  • potential advertisers
  • outline of editorial content
  • ideas for alternative streams of revenue (events, ancillary products, custom publishing, apps, e-commerce, etc.)

Then we’ll choose the best 4-5 magazines and form teams.

Once teams are formed we will go over the Final Project Assignment and roles and responsibilities for each team. In assigning roles take an inventory of your team member’s skills, traits, strengths and weaknesses.

and begin to discuss magazine mission statements.  Examples of magazine prototypes:

Creating a Magazine Prototype

Magazine Masthead

You’ll meet with your teams to:

1) Assign each person on your team to a position

2) Refine the working title for your magazine

3) Start defining your target readership and your magazine’s mission.

Clarify Your Magazine’s Mission Statement, WestGold Editorial

A good magazine mission statement:

  • Describes the publication
  • Defines how the publication is different from the competition
  • Defines how the audience benefits from reading the publication
  • Should be short and pithy (usually about 3-4 sentences)
  • Captures the spirit and tone of the magazine

Examples of Magazine Mission Statements:

New York Magazine

The Atlantic

Sunset Magazine

GQ

Family Circle

Rolling Stone

Travel & Leisure